Policy and Politics

Abbott, 2017

Chuck Abbott, “Arkansas Task Force Aims for Long-Term Recommendations on Use of Dicamba,” The Fern, August 9, 2017.

SUMMARY:

Arkansas has appointed a 21-member task force to help identify solutions for the dicamba drift damage problem, with 900 complaints received this year so far.  FULL TEXT

Abbott, 2017

Chuck Abbott, “Dicamba is ‘tremendous success,’ says Monsanto; EPA mulls rule change,” FERN’s AG Insider, August 31, 2017.

SUMMARY:

Monsanto claims they will have enough dicamba-resistant seed available for half the U.S. soybean acreage, and chief technology officer Robb Fraley described dicamba as a “tremendous success” for most farmers.  EPA, however, is considering changes ahead of the 2018 season. “We don’t consider this to be normal growing pains for a new technology,” says an EPA official who oversees herbicide regulations.  Monsanto again claims the key is “strict adherence to instructions.” FULL TEXT

American Soybean Association, 2017

American Soybean Association, ” ASA Steps up Urgency in Search for Answers on Dicamba Damage,” ASA News Release,  September 25, 2017.

SUMMARY:

This American Soybean Association (ASA) news release addresses dicamba drift damage, now an issue in 21 of the 30 soybean producing states, and reiterates their support of new formulations since “farmers need and want new technologies to help fight resistant weeds” but call out the “need to ensure that these products can be used by farmers…safely.”  Ron Moore, ASA president and farmer in dicamba-drift affected Illinois is extensively quoted and cites the ASA’s support for independent research at university ag departments in the affected states, and calls for “additional education, applications restrictions, or other actions” to address root causes of the drift problem.  While the problem is mainly stemming from soybeans, Moore recognizes the “good neighbor aspect…ASA has a duty to ensure that we are successfully coexisting with other crops.”  FULL TEXT

Antoniou et al., 2012

M Antoniou, MEM Habib,  CV Howard, RC Jennings, C Leifert, RO Nodari, CJ Robinson and J Fagan, “Teratogenic Effects of Glyphosate-Based Herbicides: Divergence of Regulatory Decisions from Scientific Evidence,” Environmental and Analytical Toxicology, S:4, 2012, DOI: 10.4172/2161-0525.S4-006.

ABSTRACT:

The publication of a study in 2010, showing that a glyphosate herbicide formulation and glyphosate alone caused malformations in the embryos of Xenopus laevis and chickens through disruption of the retinoic acid signalling pathway, caused scientific and regulatory controversy. Debate centred on the effects of the production and consumption of genetically modified Roundup Ready® soy, which is engineered to tolerate applications of glyphosate herbicide. The study, along with others indicating teratogenic and reproductive effects from glyphosate herbicide exposure, was rebutted by the German Federal Office for Consumer Protection and Food Safety, BVL, as well as in industry-sponsored papers. These rebuttals relied partly on unpublished industry-sponsored studies commissioned for regulatory purposes, which, it was claimed, showed that glyphosate is not a teratogen or reproductive toxin.

However, examination of the German authorities’ draft assessment report on the industry studies, which underlies glyphosate’s EU authorisation, revealed further evidence of glyphosate’s teratogenicity. Many of the malformations found were of the type defined in the scientific literature as associated with retinoic acid teratogenesis. Nevertheless, the German and EU authorities minimized these findings in their assessment and set a potentially unsafe acceptable daily intake (ADI) level for glyphosate. This paper reviews the evidence on the teratogenicity and reproductive toxicity of glyphosate herbicides and concludes that a new and transparent risk assessment needs to be conducted. The new risk assessment must take into account all the data on the toxicity of glyphosate and its commercial formulations, including data generated by independent scientists and published in the peer-reviewed scientific literature, as well as the industry-sponsored studies.  FULL TEXT

Associated Press, 2017a

Associated Press, “Arkansas governor approves board’s limits on dicamba use,” The Washington Times, January 4, 2017.

SUMMARY:

Reports that Gov. Hutchinson has approved the Arkansas State Plant Board’s proposal to limit when and where dicamba can be sprayed in the upcoming planting season.  It includes a requirement for a 1 mile buffer zone before spraying dicamba, except on pasture or rangeland. FULL TEXT

BASF, 1999

BASF, Distinct Herbicide Label, October 25, 1999, EPA Registration Number: 7969-150.

SUMMARY:

First label for Distinct herbicide, containing sodium dicamba plus diflufenzopyr (DFFP).  FULL TEXT

BASF, 2007

BASF, Status Herbicide Label, August 24, 2007, EPA Registration Number: 7969-242.

SUMMARY:

Early herbicide label for Status herbicide, containing sodium dicambaplus DFFP and safener.

FULL TEXT

BASF, 2015

BASF, FeXapan Herbicide Label, July 23, 2015, EPA Registration Number 352-913.

SUMMARY:

First label for BASF FeXapan Herbicide containing DGA dicamba and inert ingredients intended to reduce volatility and drift.  FULL TEXT

BASF, 2016a

BASF, Engenia Herbicide Label, December 20, 2016, EPA Registration Number: 7969-345.

SUMMARY:

EPA label for Engenia Herbicide for dicamba-resistant crops. FULL TEXT

BASF, 2016b

BASF Press Release, “Engenia herbicide from BASF now registered by EPA,”  Farm Industry News, 2016.

SUMMARY:

BASF press release about EPA approval of Engenia herbicide for dicamba-tolerant soybean and cotton.  Includes claims of a 70% reduction in volatility.  FULL TEXT